New sculpture revealed
26.08.19
Chapple Architecture design winners for Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery
23.07.19
Kororā Media Release
22.03.19
Now Open!
13.03.19
Governor General Visit
04.02.19
Volunteers sought for Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery
01.01.19
Acrow Ltd gets behind Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery
26.09.18
Additional funding requested to complete construction of Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery
19.03.18
Rotary International President Tours Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery
15.03.18
LOCAL AND NATIONAL BUSINESSES PUT A ROOF OVER NATIVE BIRDS’ HEADS
20.11.17
Conservation Minister Maggie Barry Visits Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery Construction Site
13.09.17
Collaboration pushes Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery to reach new milestone
25.08.17
Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery celebrates beginning of construction
21.04.17
Central Energy Trust Wildbase Recovery released for tender
05.03.17
Central Energy Trust grant gives Wildbase Recovery greenlight
14.09.16
‘Nightshade’ checks out of Wildbase Hospital
03.08.16
Investing in Communities and Wildbase Recovery
18.07.16
Youngsters get involved in wildlife recovery
24.06.16
DOC Director-General visits Wildbase Recovery site
10.06.16
International filmmakers connect with Wildbase Recovery
19.05.16
Fully recovered NZ Falcon returns to Taranaki
19.05.16
Powerco announced as Education Centre naming sponsor
31.03.16
Helping whio and Wildbase Recovery
22.03.16
National backing for Wildbase Recovery
12.02.16
Community backing for national wildlife recovery centre
09.12.15
Rugby World Cup energy needed to fight for wildlife on home turf
15.11.15
Wild kākā checks out Wildbase Recovery site
30.09.15
Wildbase Recovery’s partnerships contribute to funding.
28.08.15
Keeping up with the kōkako
27.08.15
Wildbase Recovery Ambassador announced as DOC’s Threatened Species Ambassador
17.08.15
Wildbase Recovery Auction Dinner
28.07.15
Wildbase Recovery Conference
01.07.15
Funding injection for national wildlife rehabilitation project
18.06.15
Fund and friend raising for whio and Wildbase Recovery
11.06.15
Victorious recovery and release
05.06.15
Corporate sponsor recognises diagnosis in endangered species’ rehabilitation
13.05.15
New Trustee Appointment
29.04.15
Minister of Conservation meets with Wildbase Recovery team
25.02.15
Walking for Whio and for Wildbase Recovery
08.01.15
Lottery Grants Board awards $500,000 to world-class Wildbase Recovery centre
18.12.14
Local school and Lions add their support to Wildbase Recovery’s fundraising efforts.
16.12.14
Conservation Week winner
02.12.14
Recovered little blue penguin released at Himatangi
29.09.14
Pāteke breeding success an important part of Wildbase Recovery plans.
26.09.14
Governor General announced as Wildbase Recovery’s patron
20.09.14
Powerful lessons in wildlife rehab tales
27.08.14
Two significant donations boost Wildbase Recovery
27.08.14
Kiwi battlers join Wildbase Recovery fundraising campaign
26.08.14
Wild survival stories to be shared with public
13.08.14
Fundraising campaign goes wild
30.01.13
Aviary proposal to keep both exotic and natives
19.04.12

Pāteke breeding success an important part of Wildbase Recovery plans.

Pāteke breeding success an important part of Wildbase Recovery plans.

Palmerston North’s Victoria Esplanade aviaries have some exciting new residents, thanks to a breeding pair of pāteke (brown teal ducks). The three newly hatched dabbling ducklings are extra special as they are part of the Department of Conservation’s national captive breeding program for the endangered species and are an example of Wildbase Recovery’s permanent breeding avairy plans.

Once widespread throughout New Zealand the native pāteke now have an estimated 2000-2500 in the wild. Peter Russell, the Esplanade’s aviary keeper, says the latest hatch is the second this year from the pair of ducks, who recently came to Palmerston North. There’s a good indication they can go on to match their predecessors’ success, a pair of pāteke who produced approximately 108 ducklings, most of which were sent to Peacock Springs in Christchurch for pre-release conditioning, banding and radio-tagging in preparation for release around New Zealand.

When he’s not caring for the aviaries’ residents, Mr Russell is helping advise on the Wildbase Recovery project. Taking over the running of the esplanade aviary from his father in 1978, Mr Russell says it’s pretty special to be involved in something that will see the aviaries and education centre transformed. The pāteke recovery program has been a special consideration in the plans for Wildbase Recovery, former a broader contribution to the rehabilitation and survival of some of New Zealand’s most endangered species.

Plans for a permanent pāteke breeding aviary have been developed in conjunction with wildlife specialists from Massey University’s Wildbase Hospital, wildlife centre designers Studio Hansen, and Mr Russell. Natural edge wetland planting, flowing water and free draining soil will help to mimic the pāteke’s native habitat as much as possible. “Happy birds create successful breeders,” says Mr Russell. The breeders aviary is just one of the permanent breeding and inflight aviaries that will sit alongside fourteen rehabilitation aviaries once Wildbase Recovery is established.

Read the Manawatu Standard’s coverage here.