Our Patients

Wildbase-kiwi-10 Patients

Kiwi

Our iconic flightless bird, the nocturnal kiwi, once abundant in numbers are today threatened with extinction.

Apteryx species

While lucky not to break any bones after being hit by a car at 70km, this kiwi needed treatment for blood loss, bruising and trauma. Wildbase vets were able to relieve his pain through an intravenous line. Kept in an incubator for a few days the kiwi was then well enough to be moved into a larger cage where he could move around more freely. The ideal place for his rehabilitation would have been a specialised stress-free environment that would allow for natural nocturnal activity as he recovered.

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NZ WILDLIFE

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Hoiho

Also known as the yellow-eyed penguin, are unique to NZ and the rarest penguins in the world.

Megadyptes antipodes

Unfortunately predator attacks on these birds are a common occurrence. This penguin suffered massive soft tissue injuries as a result of one such tussle. He required several anaesthetic procedures to clean and close his wounds, after which infection was treated with antibiotics. In a case like this, a further two months of rehabilitation is needed to ensure feathers regrow to waterproof their coats for survival in ocean temperatures on release.

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NZ WILDLIFE

Takahe - Patients

Takahē

Once thought to be extinct, the takahē were rediscovered in 1948.

Porphyrio hochstetteri

This endemic species has only approximately 240 individuals left, making a mated pair particularly precious. One couple came to Wildbase Hospital with bumblefoot, (sores which make walking painful). As their wounds improved with daily treatment, bandage changes became less frequent. Takahē don’t handle stress well, the ground dwellers aviary will be an ideal environment where these birds can recover without seeing people. Although, you of course will be able to see them.

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NZ WILDLIFE

harrier - patients

Kāhu

Harrier Hawk play an important environmental role and need to remain in healthy numbers.

Circus approximans

You may have seen our most common bird of prey cleaning up road kill or dead farm animals, something perhaps we wouldn’t be so eager to do ourselves. These large raptors have a wingspan of up to 1 metre, yet are known as sky-dancers for their elegant gliding. Their relish for roadkill often results in unfortunate meetings with vehicles, requiring treatment for broken bones and other ailments.

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NZ WILDLIFE

Ruru - Patients

Ruru

New Zealand’s night hunters, the Morepork, are our only surviving native owl.

Ninox novaeseelandiae

These clever creatures, who can say their own name, have suffered major set-backs over the past century – including habitat-loss. This Ruru survived being hit by a car but required surgery to repair a broken bone and adequate rest to ensure the injury completely healed. Rehabilitation included physio and flight exercise, ensuring he was strong enough to catch his own food, before being released six weeks after his initial admission.

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NZ WILDLIFE

get in touch

Wildbase Recovery Community Trust

Info@wildbaserecovery.co.nz

P O Box 627
Palmerston North Central
Palmerston North 4440
New Zealand

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